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01 Сентября 2004 Журнал "FIBA Assist Magazine"

Виды спорта: Баскетбол

Рубрики: Профессиональный спорт

Автор: Purnell Oliver

The “Wall” Defense

The “Wall” Defense

The “Wall” Defense

Oliver Purnell is the head coach of Clemson University. He previously was an assistant coach at Old Dominion University and the University of Maryland, and then head coach of Radford, Old Dominion, and the University of Dayton. As head coach of the U.S. National team, his team won the World University Games in 1999. He served as an assistant coach on the bronze-medal winning U.S. Olympic team in Athens.

The philosophy of the “Wall Defense” is primary based on the concept that all five defenders are guarding the ball. This defense can be summed up simply by stating that, first and foremost, the defense is guarding the ball against the basket. “Building the Wall” is a complete team effort, and require a cohesive, unselfish group that understands how to support each of its members. Because the “Wall Defense” does not deny any pass outside the three-point line, this defense might often be misconstrued to be more conservative. Consequently, one of the major challenges in developing a defensive philosophy, that is less “man oriented” and more “ball oriented”, is maintaining pressure on the ball.

Oftentimes, the problem with teaching (or even learning a defense or developing a defensive philosophy) can be that it is played “all-ornothing.” In other words, a defense is either overly aggressive and its players are caught in situation overplaying the offense, overextending and allowing dribble penetration - or gambling too much in general - or the defense is too passive and allows the basketball to be moved wherever it would like without much opposition. The “Wall Defense” solves both of this problem. By maintaining incredible, intense ball pressure through the entire possession, while also defining specific rules of extension and denial, and, at the same time, trusting in the rest of the defense to support this constant ball pressure, a defense can succeed in being aggressive, while not overextending.

ON THE BALL

X1 guards the offensive player with the ball, and must apply intense ball pressure, while still containing his man. Second, he must remember he is “influencing” the ball to the sideline. And, third, his exact position will depend on where the offensive player’s head is.

The rule is: head-on-head, it means he should line his head up with the offensive player’s head, but always maintaining intense ball pressure and influencing the ball to the sideline (diagr. 1).

OFF THE BALL (ONE PASS AWAY)

X2 and X3 are each one pass away from the ball. With the understanding that X1, the defender on the ball, is applying intense ball pressure, X2 and X3 are guarding the ball first, and their man the second. Therefore, they must be in a position to first to show the ball-handler that there nowhere to go, and, second, to help on the dribble drive if he, indeed, decides to drive away. X2 and X3 are in what we call “Wall Position.” A term that can be used to describe how to defend the ball against the basket is that the defense is “building the wall.”

OFF THE BALL (TWO OR MORE PASSES AWAY)

X4 is two passes away from the ball, and he is on the “help position”, with one foot in the lane.

JUMPING ON THE BALL

On the pass, the defenders must “jump to the ball”simultaneously as a unit (diagr. 2). The defender, initially on the ball prior to the pass, should be most conscious of “jumping” to the ball, because his man may likely cut to the basket, looking for a return pass.

X2 is on the ball, X1 and X4 are in “the wall”. X3 is now in “help” (diagr. 3).

GUARD-TO-FORWARD PASS

The defenders “jump to the ball.” Now X4 guards the man with the ball. He must remember that, when he jumps to the ball (diagr. 4), he cannot get himself out of the position for the “middle drive.” X2 is “in the wall”, X1 is “in help” two passes away, while X3 is “in help” three passes away.

X4 is on the ball, X2 “in the wall,” X1 and X3 are “in help”, while X3 is giving X4 his “baseline support” (diagr. 5).

BASELINE DRIVE

X3 gets to the “launching pad” to stop 4 from getting to the basket. X1 “fills” the spot X3 left, and X2 “sinks” to help X1. X2 is the “zone guy” for an instant, guarding both 1 and 2, if either are to receive the ball on a pass out from 4 (diagr. 6). When the ball is stopped on the baseline, this is where players should be positioned (diagr. 7). If the pass comes out to 2, X2 guards the man with the ball, X1 gets “in a wall” position, and X3 gets in help. X4 retakes his man (diagr. 8). If the pass comes out to 1, X2 (again) takes the ball, X1 gets “in the wall” position, and X3 sprints to his “the wall” position. X4 retakes his man, however in help as well (diagr. 9).

SKIP PASS OUT OF THE POST

X1 has to now “switch” out and take out the ball, because he is the closest baseline defender. X2 gets in a “wall”, defending the ball and 1. X3 gets in “help” defending the ball and 2. X4 is helping, giving “baseline support,” guarding the ball and 4 (diagr.10).

 

Because the baseline drive created a “help” situation, on a skip pass out of the post, players are switched onto different men, but the principles remain consistent (diagr. 11).

CUTTER THROUGH

On this situation the players “jump to the ball” on the pass (X1 does not allow his man to “face cut” him). X 1 stays between his man and the ball, keeping eye on the ball, on a drive or another pass (diagr. 12).

OFFENSE REPLACES AREAS

The principles stay the same. Now, X1 is in help. He must make sure not to follow his man all the way out - this is a common mistake on a cut through the lane. X1 is now in help and can stay in the lane, unless his man either cuts to the basket or the ball becomes one pass away from his man, while X3 is in “the wall.” X4’s position is in “the wall” as well (diagr. 13).

DRIVE NOT TOWARD THE BASELINE

If the dribble drive is more in the perimeter area: this is where the “wall” begins to show its benefits. Let’s review the situation from the diagr. 2: 2 beats his defender momentarily in the direction of 4. Because X4 was in a good “wall position,” he is in good position to help, but he will do this for a moment. X4 will “show and go,” stepping up and to the driver as if to fully help, but recovering immediately to his man, putting the responsibility back to continue to “ride the driver” (diagr. 14).

The reason because X4 does not fully commit is because the “stand still”, “spot-up”, “three-point shot” - 4 in the corner is more a threat to the defense, than a contested running shot in the lane, going toward the baseline. By stepping to the ball for a moment, X4 gives the illusion that is coming to the ball completely. Oftentimes, the ball-handler will pick up his dribble, or better, yet make an errant pass to 4, assuming his defender X4 has left him and he open for a kick-out pass. Many times, if the “show and go” is executed properly, the kick-out pass can be deflected or, even, stolen.

ON THE KICK-OUT PASS

X4 may be able to deflect, or even steal, the pass. X4 is now on the ball and must make sure he recovers to the top side of the offensive player 4, so as to allow a middle drive (diagr. 15). If a perimeter player, one pass away from the ball, is outside the three-point arc, the defender X3 (and X4), is in a “wall” position, as stated earlier. However, if the offensive player steps inside the three-point arc, the defender is in a denial position. The offensive player is now a much greater threat to receive the ball in a scoring area, so the defense must become tighter an denial position assumed (diagr. 16). Because 3 and 4 are now inside the three-point arc, and one pass away, X3 and X4 assume a full denial position (“ball-you-man”), playing the passing lane (diagr. 17).

GUARD-TO-FORWARD SKIP PASS

In this case there are a number of critical movements and thoughts that must take place. First, X1 must close out in a manner that does not allow 1 to have the option of driving to the middle. He must close out in a manner that does not allow 1 to drive to the middle. He must close out with a high hand and his top foot up, forcing, if anything, a baseline drive. If this is only option 1 has, it is X4’s job to anticipate this action and be ready to beat 1 to the “launching pad.” X2 and X3 would “fill and sink,” accordingly to X1’s baseline drive (diagr. 18).

FORWARD-TO-FORWARD SKIP PASS SPOT-TO-FORWARD

In this case there are a number of critical movements and thoughts that must take place. First, X1 must close out in a manner that does not allow 1 to have the option of driving to the middle. He must close out with a high hand and his top foot up, forcing, if anything, a baseline drive. If this is only option 1 has, it is X4’s job to anticipate this action and be ready to beat 1 to the “launching pad.” X2 and X3 would “fill and sink,” accordingly on X1’s baseline drive (diagr. 19).

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