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01 Сентября 2003 Журнал "FIBA Assist Magazine"

Виды спорта: Баскетбол

Рубрики: Профессиональный спорт, Детско-юношеский спорт

Автор: Beveridge Rob

Australian National Junior Team: A Full Court Trapping Defense

Australian National Junior Team: A Full Court Trapping Defense

Australian National Junior Team: A Full Court Trapping Defense

Rob Beveridge, 2000 National Junior Coach of the Year in Australia, is the Head Coach of Australian National Junior Men’s team, the 2003 World Champion. Since 1997, he is the head coach of the New South Wales Institute for Sport, Basketball Program.

I believed that for our team to compete effectively against the best in the world, we would have to implement a style of game that not only suited our personnel, but that could also put us in a position to win games.

Our National team, named the “Emus”, the typical Australian bird, was relatively small compared to other nations and was, to some extent, less talented offensively. We had to implement a system that allowed us to play an up tempo style of game that would be difficult for teams to adapt to. Offensively, we had to push the ball forward quickly to gain easy transition baskets. Defensively, we had to have a variety of defenses that could create confusion within the other teams.

Although we had some offensive deficiencies, we had an exceptionally committed group of players who enjoyed the challenge of playing hard-nosed defense. The players believed in what they were doing within our defensive system and were completely discplined in executing it.

Our goal was to generate quick, effective offence by using pressure defense to significantly disrupt our opponent’s offence. The main defensive weapons for our team were our half court traps and full court presses.

FULL COURT PRESSES

In the full court, we generally applied two different full court presses. The first type we called 50 on, where we wanted to trap the main ball handler. The second type we called 50 off, where we would face guard and try and get a quick turnover. Both of these presses were used to increase the tempo of the game and to create turnovers.

HALF COURT TRAPS

We utilised three different half-court traps. We either trapped the ball handler, which we called 12 on, or the first pass, which we called 12 off. In our third variation, 12 delay, we did not trap (but sometimes faked the trap), causing the opposition to use significant time off their clock, reducing their time to execute on offence and creating increasing mental pressure.

The purpose of using the combination of traps and presses was primarily to control the tempo of the game. We wanted to put the opposition in a situation where the consistent pressure would cause mental and physical errors, which in turn would ultimately allow us to score easy baskets.

The type of defense we would use would depend on our assessment of the situation we were in. For example, if we wanted to slow the game, we could apply the half court traps. If we wanted to increase the tempo, we could apply the full court presses. Furthermore, our system of different defenses gave us the flexibility to change quickly between the defenses as situations changed. We could alter the defense depending on whether it was a dead ball situation, off a made free-throw, from a back court out of bounds situation or from a made basket.

In the 1/4 court, we mixed up our defenses between man to man and match up zone. Unfortunately, there is insufficient space available in this article to expand on the detail related to this part of our system.

No matter which one of our different types of defense was being played, the following were key requirements to our defenses being successful:

  1. Ball pressure was imperative. All players needed to have the ability to apply great ball pressure so the offensive player would not be able to see the open player. We did not want to steal the ball in the trap, rather, we wanted to get a deflection of the ball as it was passed, which could then be intercepted by the rotating defense.
  2. Closing out in good stance was essential. All players had to be able to close out with good balance so the opposition could not easily split the trap or dribble past them. This was necessary to prevent possible transition baskets.
  3. Containment of middle penetration. All players must be always in a good stance to allow the defense to move laterally and funnel the ball away from the middle towards the sideline. We had to slow the ball down, to allow the other defensive players to sprint back behind the ball.
  4. Rotation from traps. After the ball has left a trapped area all players must sprint back and adjust to the appropriate situation they have to sprint back behind the “line of the ball”. Our rotation rule from the trap was that the defender who “sees” the pass go out of the trap will leave the trap. Therefore, the defender who has his back to the ball will stay and deny the offensive player.

The remainder of this article will cover two of our full court presses in detail, 50 on and 50 off.

50 ON -1 - 2 - 1 - 1 ALIGNMENT

In this defense, we are looking at trapping the best ball handler.

X4 applies enormous ball pressure on 5 so he cannot make a direct full court pass to 3 or 4.

X1 and X2 do not deny: they have to force their respective players 1 and 2 to lead for the ball in the corner. If 1 and 2 screen for each other or cross sides, X1 and X2 they simply switch. X3 starts near the top of the circle ready to anticipate and intercept the pass. X3 should be looking at the eyes of the passer. X5 is the safety player and must be ready to intercept any long pass (diagr. 1).

5 IN-BOUNDS THE BALL TO 1

X4 leaves the inbound passer 5 and applies a trap with X1 in the corner on 1 with great ball pressure (diagr. 2).

IF 1 PASSES BACK TO 5

X2 will shoot the gap towards 5 looking for the steal. If X2 does not intercept the pass, he must contain this player and not allow any penetration.

IF 5 PASSES THE BALL ON TO 2

X3 will take this player.X4 will deny 1 the ball. X2 and X1 must sprint back to the key.

IF 1 PASSES TO 2

X3 will look to shoot the gap looking for steal. If X3 cannot steal the ball, he must contain this player and slow the penetration down to allow other defensive players to get back.

X4 will deny 1 the ball. X5 will initially need to guard two players, 2 and 3, and will take the next pass if made (X5 may be required to hedge and recover if the second pass is made). X2 and X1 must sprint back behind the line of ball, into the key (diagr. 3).

IF 1 PASSES TO 4

X3 will look to shoot the gap looking for steal.

If X3 cannot steal the ball, he must contain this player and slow the penetration down to allow other defensive players to get back. X1 will deny 1 the ball.

X2 and X4 must sprint back behind the line of ball, into the key (diagr. 4).

IF 1 PASSES TO 3

If X3 cannot steal the ball, he must contain this player and slow the penetration down to allow other defensive players to get back. X1 will deny 1 the ball.

X5 will initially need to guard two players, 2 and 4, and will take the next pass if made. X5 may be required to hedge and recover if the second pass is made.

X2 and X4 must sprint back behind the line of ball, into the key (diagr. 5).

From this situation we can either match up in man or zone defense.

50 OFF - 1 - 2 - 1 - 1 ALIGNMENT

In this defense we are encouraging the lob pass over the face guard for steal or trap. 5 is the inbound passer.

X4 applies enormous ball pressure so 5 cannot see the open player.

X1 and X2 completely face guard their respective offensive players.

X3 is the “centre fielder” or interceptor.

X5 is the safety player (diagr. 6).

IF 5 MAKES THE PASS OVER THE TOP OF X1

X3 looks to intercept the ball.

If X3 cannot intercept the ball, he must contain the ball.

X1 will look to trap with X3.

X2 and X4 will sprint back behind the line of the ball. They may look to be interceptors. X2 will cover the basket. X4 will cover the middle.

X5 will anticipate and look to intercept any pass to 3 or 4 (diagr. 7).

IF 1 PASSES THE BALL TO 3

X5 will look for intercept or trap.

X1 will leave the initial trap and then trap with X5.

X3 can deny 1, the main ball handler.

X4 must get back behind the line of ball (diagr. 8).

IF 01 PASSES THE BALL TO 04

X5 will look for intercept or trap.

X2 will go and trap with X5.

X1 will leave the initial trap and get back behind the line of the ball.

X3 can deny 1, the main ball handler.

X4 will cover the basket (diagr. 9). From this situation we can either match up in man or zone defense.

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